6 Things I Wish I Had Known Before Making a Web Series

The Unemployed Roommate genre is so worn out that even your mom may not be persuaded to watch.

“So what are you up to at the moment?”

“Oh, I’m just working on a web series.”

The faces of loved ones often fall as quickly as their hearts with the news of yet another striving artist setting off on a quest to write, produce and star in a web series—and with good reason.  Once upon a time, the novelty value of the web series as a form was enough to secure some modest viewership. Now? Not so much.

Today, the shows winning the lion’s share of TV awards are actually, quite literally, web series: “House of Cards,” “Orange Is the New Black,” “Transparent.” These shows live on Netflix, Amazon Prime, etc.; they stream via VOD platforms that have begun to challenge cable supremacy in the production and delivery of quality serial content.

“Once upon a time, the novelty value of the web series as a form was enough to secure some modest viewership.”

With the advent of what is essentially online cable, in just a few short years, a distinction has cropped up between “network” web series and “indie” web series. And most indie web series are, let’s face it, quite dreadful. They are independent because only loved ones could ever endure them…which is why friends and family get squeamish at the first mention. Those indie web series that aren’t dreadful are generally confined to the corners and crevices of user-uploaded platforms, unable to compete with the riveting viral videos of teenagers like PewDiePie playing video games and providing running commentary of their virtual achievements. It’s a content jungle out there…

Read the rest of this article from Indiewire.